The Energy Institute holds a one-day conference on energy research and policy in Berkeley every March. The event brings together outstanding scholars and practitioners from around the world to exchange ideas and research results on topics related to energy markets and regulation.

The next POWER Conference will take place on March 20, 2020 in Spieker Forum, Haas School of Business – UC Berkeley. Registration will open in late January.

2019 POWER Conference

  • Spatial Externalities in Groundwater Extraction: Evidence from Electricity Usage in California Agriculture
  • Decompositions and Policy Consequences of an Extraordinary Decline in Air Pollution from Electricity Generation
  • Market Power and Incentive-based Capacity Payment Mechanisms
  • Setting with the Sun: The Impacts of Renewable Energy on Wholesale Power Markets
  • The Welfare Costs of Misaligned Incentives: Energy Inefficiency and the Principal-Agent Problem
  • Price Discrimination, Search, and Negotiation in an Oligopoly: A Field Experiment in Retail Electricity
  • The Electric Gini: Income Redistribution through Energy Prices

2018 POWER Conference

  • Dynamic Pricing, Attention, and Automation: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Electricity Consumption
  • Do the Effects of Social Nudges Persist? Theory and Evidence from 38 Natural Field Experiments
  • Are Residential Electricity Prices Too High or Too Low? Or Both?
  • Vertical Market Power in Interconnected Natural Gas and Electricity Markets
  • The Roles of Energy Markets and Environmental Regulation in Reducing Coal-Fired Plant Profits and Electricity Sector Emissions
  • Compatibility and Investment in the U.S. Electric Vehicle Market
  • Variable Pricing and the Social Cost of Renewable Energy

2017 POWER Conference

  • Do Energy Efficiency Investments Deliver at the Right Time?

  • Making the Best of the Second-Best: Welfare Consequences of Time-Varying Electricity Prices

  • Summertime, and Pass-Through is Easier: Chasing Down Price Elasticities for Residential Natural Gas Demand in 275 Million Bills

  • The Long(er)-Run Price Elasticity of Electricity Demand: Evidence from Municipal Electric Aggregation in Illinois

  • Machine Learning from Schools about Energy Efficiency

  • Residential Building Codes Do Save Energy: Evidence from Hourly Smart-Meter Data

  • Price Regulation and Environmental Externalities: Evidence from Methane Leaks

  • Does Strategic Ability Affect Efficiency? Evidence from Electricity Markets